Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘Animal Welfare’


I realize not all of my devoted followers reside in Oregon, or in America for that matter. Still, I believe most all of us view bald eagles as mystical, magical–and oft-maligned. Let’s hope this was a wound of nature, not inflicted by a human; and that this majestic creature is soon healed and airborne.

Injured bald eagle awaits rescue. Photo source: http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news

Bald eagle, grounded with an injured shoulder. Photo source: http://www.flashalertnewswire.net/images/news

News Release from: McMinnville Police Dept.
“On April 09, 2011 at about 1:30 pm, Officer Steve Macartney was dispatched to an animal call at 2400 SE Stratus Avenue near space #12, McMinnville. Local residents had found an injured bald eagle in some nearby brush. Officer Macartney confirmed that the injured bird was a bald eagle. With assistance from Oregon State Police, the Audubon Societycame out and took the bald eagle for rehabilitation.According to Deb Sheaffer of the Audubon Society, the bald eagle appears to be a five to six year old female with an injured shoulder. The eagle is in stable condition at this time, but the prognosis for release is guarded.  She is being treated with antibiotics and supportive care and will be evaluated day by day. She said that if the eagle recovers completely, it will be returned to the McMinnville area and will be released back into her territorial area.

Anyone with questions about the Audubon Society, their work, or this particular incident can call Deb Shaeffer at 503-292-6855 x125.  They can also be contacted through www.audubonportland.org

A FEW BALD EAGLE FACTS:

They mate for life; however if one dies, the survivor will accept another mate.

Their life expectancy is 15 to 20 years, but they can live as long as 30 years.

They are unique to North America. They are most concentrated in Alaska but are also found in Canada and every state in the United States except Hawaii.

They are no longer on the Endangered list, but they are still considered threatened because of poachers, habitat loss and injuries caused by man-made things, such as  power lines.

Advertisements

Read Full Post »


I was moved to tears when I saw this image on a friend’s Facebook page last week with this tagline, “Dog and owner reunion in Japan.” Today I saw the photo on a Yahoo News site with this caption and a Reuters news agency credit,”A woman shares her food with her dog at an evacuation center for pets and their owners near an area devastated.”

It was the chopsticks that got me. When disaster strikes, no matter where in the world it occurs, I’m always reminded of one thing important to people in nearly every culture and country: Pets.

Some would even say pets are essential for humans to retain their humanity.

Still, the elephant in the living room (the thing no one wants to admit is present) is the fate of pets impacted by the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear meltdown in Japan. I admit, finally — and here in black-and-white, that during or following a disaster, my primary concern is the welfare of animals. I suspect that’s blasphemy of some sort in some circles somewhere. But not here on a blog about animals being everything to us.

I know there are thousands of folks right there with me, who believe we need to help the innocent, silent, four-legged victims of the March 11 quake in Japan just as we do the hurting, homeless people there.

In fact, there are extensive relief efforts underway in Japan to rescue and shelter pets. This Yahoo News article is a good place to learn more about how to help the animal rescue crews doing this beyond-hard-and-beyond-sad work on the ground in Japan.

The story title is, “Japan Animal Rescues Rush to Save Pets Affected by Earthquake, Tsunami.” You’ll find it at: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ac/20110319/lf_ac/8095542_japan_animal_rescues_rush_to_save_pets_affected_by_earthquake_tsunami

The grand scale of Japan’s devastation harkened me back to the massive pet rescue operations that followed Hurricane Katrina, which hit the Gulf Coast of America in 2005.  The last account I read estimated that 15,000 pets were rescued, reunited or re-homed in the Katrina aftermath. Approximately 250,000 were not, because they drowned or starved.

Proof that animals are everything to many people: Think about the great many times during the Katrina evacuation that, on TV, we saw or heard people refuse to leave their home and get out of harm’s way unless they could take their beloved dog, cat, bird, fish with them. That, in most cases, was not permitted.

So people stayed, sometimes dying with their pet in their arms.

At least those Katrina pets were not lost for naught. Politicians and lawmakers recognized that saving pets ultimately saves people’s lives. Following the hurricane, the U.S. government passed the Pet Evacuation Transportation Safety (PETS) Act, which states that local governments must include “companion animals” in their disaster planning efforts.

Although this typically applies to dogs and cats, many jurisdictions are making the effort to include a wide variety of animals—including exotics, horses and non-traditional pets—in their disaster plans. However, this varies from locality to locality. (Source http://www.aspca.org)

Schools routinely have drills for staff and students to “walk through” disaster plans. Families are encouraged to practice what to do if disaster strikes their home.

Let’s give our companion animals that level of care: Put a plan in place, practice it WITH your pet and work out the kinks. For example, if your cat won’t go into a cat carrier, train it now, so your feline won’t refuse to do so in an emergency.

You can learn more about animal-related disaster laws and preparations at: Pet Laws for Evacuation | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/list_7488437_pet-laws-evacuation.html#ixzz1HMvkrn1u. For tips on planning ahead in case of  a disaster, visit:  http://www.fema.gov/plan/prepare/animals.shtm#1.dog

 

After barking at approaching reporters, the dog on the left led them to its hurt canine comrade.

Rescue efforts are not limited to people aiding animals. Sometimes, animals help animals. Watch this short news video and see a remarkable instance of one dog’s devotion to another dog, following the earthquake in Japan.

Here’s how the San Francisco Chronicle’s website, SFGate, described the scene: “In the aftermath of Japan’s earthquake and tsunami, a tired, muddy and disoriented spaniel emerged from a pile of rubble to lead rescuers to his injured four-legged pal. He had remained steadfast beside his canine compatriot since the disaster leveled their home six days ago.

“The hero hound was housed at a local animal shelter while rescuers took his injured companion for treatment at a veterinarian hospital in nearby Mito.” You can see the video at http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/blogs/pets/detail?entry_id=85210#ixzz1HOkyiM3B.

THIS WEEK’S ANIMAL LESSON: “Be part of the solution, not the problem.”

Read Full Post »


As much as I love writing about animals, helping animals is an underlying reason for AnimalsOurEVERYTHING!, the blog.

Here’s an easy way we can all help animals waiting for forever homes.  Today, March 15, animal lovers everywhere are uniting to spread the word about how good it is to think “adopt” or “rescue” when searching for a new pet companion. It’s good for the pets, and it’s good for our souls.

Kobe, a chocolate Labrador retriever that came to us four years ago. Finding a new dog was a first order of business when we moved from California to Oregon. We knew our new place wouldn't feel like home until dog hair and paw prints appeared all about.

I am always staggered at the  incomprehensible number of homeless  critters: Petfinder, alone, has a database of 320,000 in-need animals. Many followers of AnimalsOurEVERYTHING! have pooches and kitties brought to them through some form of pet adoption.

We (husband, son and I) currently have two re-homed Labrador retrievers and a cat that adopted us when she was abandoned and pregnant.

Brooke, our black Labrador retriever, was "rehomed" with us two years ago. She is a most exuberant companion for Kobe as well as for us.

Please consider e-mailing and tweeting friends and posting on Facebook and blogs about this Adopt the Internet Campaign.

But first, I hope you’ll take a look at the blog post written by Dr. Nancy Kay, a friend, a vet — and one of the smartest, kindest women I know, about Adopt the Internet. She offers great perspective and first-person accounts of dog adoption.
http://speakingforspot.com/blog/.

(Check out Dr. Kay’s book, “Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life,” while you’re on her blog. Visits to your vet will  never be the same — they’ll be better.)

Thanks and bowwow meow!

—————————————————–

*What It’s All About*
In honor of our 15th birthday <http://www.petfinder.com/info/birthday>,
Petfinder is asking people everywhere to pledge to spread the word online
about adoptable pets on March 15, 2011.

Adopt the Internet

By Nancy Kay, DVM

Please, will you join the “Help Petfinder Adopt the Internet Day” effort on March 15th?  Email your dog loving friends and relatives.  Feel free to share this blog post with them.  Heck, write a blog post of your own! Together we will increase awareness about adopting homeless pets and hopefully create the kinds of happy endings that Quinn and my family have enjoyed.

Do you have your own story about adopting a homeless pet?  We’d love to hear it.   Know of an animal who needs a home?  On March 15th, please post a photo along with adoption contact information on Dr. Kay’s  Facebook page (http://www.facebook.com/speakingforspot).

Nancy Kay, DVM
Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine
Author of Speaking for Spot: Be the Advocate Your Dog Needs to Live a Happy, Healthy, Longer Life
Recipient, American Animal Hospital Association Animal Welfare and Humane Ethics Award
Recipient, Dog Writers Association of America Award for Best Blog
Recipient, Eukanuba Canine Health Award
Recipient, AKC Club Publication Excellence Award
Become a Fan of Speaking for Spot on Facebook

Read Full Post »


 

Matilda, a rescued brood jenny, was bred every year of her life yet never fed anything but straw. Malnourishment during pregnancy is one of the reasons Matilda’s back has become so swayed. God bless Apifera Farm for bringing her home. Photo source: http://www.apiferafarm.blogspot.com/

DONKEYS. Katherine Dunn, an acquaintance of a good friend and farmer, has an awesome website and blog where she shares wonderful pieces and photos of her Oregon farm, Apifera, and life there. Katherine, an accomplished artist who is devoted to animal rescue, describes it as the place where art and animals collide.

She happily admits being enraptured with donkeys, most especially their oh-so-telling ears. She was reaching out to help find homes for nine recently-rescued donkeys (Their owner was going to shoot them, because they were in such sad shape he knew they’d bring him nothing at auction.) when I first learned about her talent, her farm and her missions. You, too, can learn more about everything Apifera at http://www.apiferafarm.blogspot.com/.

If you’re searching for a worthy animal-related cause to support, consider helping the donkeys and other critters at Apifera.

If you have an interest in providing a home for one of Matilda’s herd mates, please visit the website for Lavender Dream Farms in Washington where they are now residing and awaiting forever homes: http://www.lavenderdreamsfarm.net/

Read Full Post »